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Clinical Focus

Unwrapping a big issue

Ann Rudowski outlines some simple strategies to reduce skin tears. Skin tears have in the past received little attention with the apparent view that they are necessarily a consequence of ageing; clearly this is not the case. While ageing is ...

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Nutrition and wound healing

Virginia Fazio looks at the role of nutrition in wound healing. Wounds that take more than four to six weeks to heal are defined as chronic, non-healing or slow to heal. These can include pressure ulcers, ulcers on legs and ...

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The politics of woundcare

The recent Wound Awareness campaigns have gained some traction and the importance of wounds as a health issue is now clear to the Department, writes Tal Ellis. Politics and wound management are uneasy bedfellows. If we accept that humane treatment ...

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A two pronged approach to skin protection

Skin tears have aptly been described as the enemy of delicate skin, but there are ways to prevent them, writes Ann Rudowski. ActionWorks has developed an intervention approach aimed at making a significant contribution to reducing the number of skin ...

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Beyond words

The use of arts as a therapeutic tool in dementia care is growing. Darragh O Keeffe reports on the new movement in Australia. Ten years ago Dr Dalia Gottlieb-Tanaka knew next to nothing about dementia. But an unlikely friendship with ...

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Great minds come together

From technology to media and architecture, a world-first Perth centre plans to integrate the various disciplines involved in dementia research. Megan Stoyles reports. Alzheimers Australia WA and Curtin University of Technology are developing a world-first dementia care multi-disciplinary research, teaching ...

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Change is coming

A new paper highlights the challenges for gay and lesbian seniors with dementia and has key messages for providers and care staff. Darragh O Keeffe reports. Tony Walsh and his partner of 20 years, Paul Wenn, recently had a difficult ...

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All about attitude

The words we use around people with dementia are important, but so too is how we say them, writes Jane Verity. To say darling or not to say darling – that is the question. The three words darling, dearie or ...

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